Christian perspective on online dating

The supposition that the author was one and the same with the beloved disciple is often advanced as a means of insuring that the evangelist did witness Jesus' ministry.

Two other passages are advanced as evidence of the same - and . does not claim that the author was the one who witnessed the scene but only that the scene is related on the sound basis of eyewitness.

Some maintain that 'water and' in 3:5 and the discourse in -59 are insertions of a later hand by one interested in strengthening the explicit sacramental teachings of the gospel.The external evidence fixes the terminus ad quem for the Gospel of John. 180), and Tatian included the Gospel of John in his harmony (c. The Gospel of John is also mentioned in the Muratorian Canon (c. Thus one of the basic features of the institution scenes in the synoptics is missing.Furthermore, there is no account of the baptism of Jesus, and there is confusion about whether or not Jesus practiced baptism (compare and 4:2).But at last Christ departed from Jesus, and that then Jesus suffered and rose again, while Christ remained impassible, inasmuch as he was a spiritual being" (1.26.1). How could it be that the Fourth Gospel was at one time in its history regarded as the product of an Egyptian-trained gnostic, and at another time in its history regarded as composed for the very purpose of attacking this same gnostic?Irenaeus stated that the purpose of John at Ephesus was as follows: by the proclamation of the Gospel, to remove that error which by Cerinthus had been disseminated among men, and a long time previously by those termed Nicolaitans, who are an offset of that 'knowledge' [gnosis] falsely so called, that he might confound them, and persuade them that there is but one God, who made all things by His Word; and not, as they allege, that the Creator was one, but the Father and the Lord another; and that the Son of the Creator was, forsooth, one, but the Christ from above another (3.11.1) Helms argues: "So the gospel attributed, late in the second century, to John at Ephesus was viewed as an anti-gnostic, anti-Cerinthean work.

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