Dating chinese export porcelain

The maritime archaeology of Sten Sjostrand has led to major advances in the study of Asian trade and trade ceramics in Southeast Asia.

His meticulous documentation of a series of nine shipwrecks from the 11th to 19th centuries reveals the early dominance of Chinese trade ceramics, a subsequent loss of the Chinese monopoly in the late 14th century when Southeast Asian ceramics entered the market, the basic parameters of the Ming gap shortages of the 14th-15th centuries, and a resurgence of Chinese wares in the 16th and 17th centuries.

The (purple) clay teapots made at Yixing are made from a granular clay and therefore perfect for brewing Chinese tea.A lifetime’s experience with the sea and sailing allows Sjostrand to bring new understanding to ancient ship construction, and his voluminous reading allows him to set the ships and their cargoes in historical perspective. This was done in order to formalize and to expand on the company’s researcher’s extensive knowledge of Asia’s ceramic developments and maritime trade.for more than two decades and another decade researching maritime trade.This teapot is likely to produce nice tea as it, like all other teapots on this page, are made from the "old Yixing clay". The teapot will be delivered with a This intact, medium teapot gives an overall good impression with nice colored clay.The spout and the handle are attached with good care and skill. There is a small chip on the inside rim of the lid.

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